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Thread: Oil pan gasket won't stop leaking even after new gasket.

  1. #1

    Join Date
    08 Jul 2006
    Location
    Louisiana, USA

    Oil pan gasket won't stop leaking even after new gasket.

    Just to let people know, I have a B16a OBD0 PR3 engine.

    I replaced my pan gasket because I proved that it was leaking, and after examining the gasket during the replacement process, I could see splits in the gasket. My new gasket is a Felpro gasket that is a blue colored rubbery gasket material. It leaks just a little bit, but it is sooooo annoying. I crawled under it and tightened down on it some more and I think it helped. When I installed the gasket, I used brake parts cleaner to clean the oil pan surface and to clean the oil pan railing of the block to make sure that there was no oil present on either of the two surfaces. I didn't use any silicone or sealant since the gasket is a rubbery type. At first, I torqued the gasket to the OEM recommended 108 inch pounds. Then again, after I found the leak, I tightened down on it some more (actually I tightened the hell out of it). I think that it might be an ultra slow leak. I may have just fixed it and not know it.

    Two questions I would like to ask are:

    1) Should I have tightened the hell out of the pan bolts from the start, or has anyone had any experience with this type of pan gasket?

    2) Could I be having a problem with not venting enough crankcase pressure? I took the oil fill cap off and there was a shit load of crankcase pressure emitting through the fill hole (which is somewhat normal), but this pressure flow pretty much slowed to a halt when I increased the throttle. Should I say f##k the OEM ventilation system, and just run a reinforced clear vacuum hose from the valvecover fitting to a crankcase breather can with a filter on the top and a drain that goes to the oil pan or just have a drain valve that I empty periodically? I know on SB chevy's, you risk having a front/rear main seal leak when you do not ventilate the crankcase properly.

    What do ya'll think???????????

  2. #2
    Sam92Teg
    Sometimes when you over torque the pan bolts, the gasket actually gets squeezed out of place causing a leak. You also have to worry about breaking off bolts or studs. I also have a blue rubberized oil pan gasket, came on the car, and I have reused it several times with 9 ft/lbs if I remember correctly, seals fine.

    As for venting off pressure in your crankcase, the stock PCV valve should be checked and all hoses connected normally. You could do a compression test to see if the rings are allowing the cylinder pressure to escape into the crankcase I guess.

  3. #3

    Join Date
    20 Jun 2006
    Location
    NJ, USA
    wouldn't the pressure escape threw the pcv or the breather on the cover to the intake tube out the intake althought all the valves are closed and at tdc?

  4. #4

    Join Date
    29 Dec 2003
    Location
    Spartanburg, South Carolina
    Hehe...you shouldn't have "tightened the hell out of them." The oil pan bolts are only supposed to be torqued very lightly. I forgot exactly how many ft.lbs. (check the Helms), but it's barely over hand tight. That's probably why it's leaking. I made that same mistake the first time I ever changed the oil pan gasket, and now I know why it leaked. HTH.

    Chris

  5. #5
    Sam92Teg
    wouldn't the pressure escape threw the pcv or the breather on the cover to the intake tube out the intake althought all the valves are closed and at tdc?
    The valves have nothing to do with it, and they aren't all closed at once. You have them closed on compression stroke and power stroke, but intake and exhaust strokes they are open. Now if you had a valve that isn't sealing properly, then on the power and compression stroke, the pressure would be escaping the cylinder, but I don't think that was your question.

    Yes, a properly functioning PCV system will remove/relieve excess crankcase pressure into the intake stream. That's why on older engines, you should use some carb cleaner sprayed into the throttle body to clean out the oily residue that is caused by blow-by gases being recirculated.

  6. #6

    Join Date
    08 Jul 2006
    Location
    Louisiana, USA
    When I installed the new gasket, I torqued the bolts/nuts to the OEM spec of 108 inch pounds which equates to 10 foot pounds. I think that there was some torque error, mainly since the gasket slightly poooofed outwards, and we all know what happens when a rubber gasket is poooofed outwards tooooo much. I tightened the hell out of it later that night when I crawled underneath my car when I discovered that it was leaking. I never used any silicone. However, when I replace the gasket again, I will use a Honda gasket, and try to figure out where to apply the HondaBond sealant. I was told that with the b-series pan gasket, to apply silicone to and around the bolts and bolt-holes.

    But yes, I think that I underwent some instrumentation error, because just as always with a rubber gasket, it will just keep needing more tightening, or at least it seems that way. What I mean by this is that after torqing all of the bolts/nuts in proper sequence, you can repeat the sequence and find that some of the bolts/nuts "loosened up." But what's really going on is that the rubber is still able to be sqwoooshed, which I suppose makes it seem as if it has loosend up and needs to be retorqued. And eventually after the continuous retorquing, the rubber has squooooshed way tooooo much. See, when I first torqued the bolts, it just took way to many turns before the bolts on the small length sides of the pan torqued to spec, which resulted in way to much sqwoooshing out of the gasket.

    At this point, I am debating of whether or not my engine was shipped with a bent oil pan. I mean, why should an engine with roughly 35,000 miles have a leaking oil pan gasket? I do realize the effects of age on the life of a gasket, but i am starting to think that my motor had its original pan robbed off of it and a defective pan was put back on it. But that is a negative interpretation of what the problem really is. I just think that the next time I replace my gasket, I will just need to make sure that I am doing everything properly on my behalf. Which includes all of the simple stuff like holding the torque wrench by only its handle, making sure that I am using an inch pound torque wrench instead of setting a foot pound torque wrench to 10 foot pounds, and things like that.

    I just need to get my sh#t straight, regroup some thoughts, and start it all over again, and try to make it work. Then I can start to think of other things such as my roof leaking when it rains. LOL

  7. #7

    Join Date
    20 Jun 2006
    Location
    NJ, USA
    The valves have nothing to do with it, and they aren't all closed at once. You have them closed on compression stroke and power stroke, but intake and exhaust strokes they are open. Now if you had a valve that isn't sealing properly, then on the power and compression stroke, the pressure would be escaping the cylinder, but I don't think that was your question.

    Yes, a properly functioning PCV system will remove/relieve excess crankcase pressure into the intake stream. That's why on older engines, you should use some carb cleaner sprayed into the throttle body to clean out the oily residue that is caused by blow-by gases being recirculated.
    that's what i thought

  8. #8
    omGARY92
    When I installed the new gasket, I torqued the bolts/nuts to the OEM spec of 108 inch pounds which equates to 10 foot pounds.
    108 in./12 in. = 9 ft., which should be correct.
    I'm planning on doing the same thing, plus replace the oil pressure switch -- the dealer at Acura sold me 3M instead of Hondabond (he told me Hondabond doesn't hold).
    Anyways, this doesn't seem too difficult -- it IS in the Teg Tips section.

  9. #9

    Join Date
    19 Sep 2002
    Location
    Washington State, USA
    So what was the turn out, did replacing the gasket fix the leak?

    I just replaced my oil pan gasket with a blue felpro and I'm still getting a leak from the gasket, everything was torqued to 9 ft-lbs, so im stumped.


  10. #10
    White90
    I've had a ghoulish time trying to make my DA stop leaking. Ever time I would replace the gasket I would honda-bond it. Finally I noticed that on the last time I pulled it that the bolts weren't tight at all. Leads me to believe that they vibrated out. I replaced the gasket one last time the day I was selling the car, used red-loctite. I think it's still leaking, I gave it my best.

    Now this next car has the same shit, minor oil leak in about the same spot. I need to install a tapped oil pan anyways, hope I get it right this time.. I'm gonna use some red loctite.

    I just went into the honda dealer and the service manager said he has always followed the book and never had one come back and leak on him. He said if they came back at all it was their rear main seal or front main seal leaking. How the fuck can he get so lucky is my question in all his D series pan swaps. I'm gonna try this again.

  11. #11

  12. #12

    Join Date
    19 Sep 2002
    Location
    Washington State, USA
    I think I found out what my problem is....

    When I installed the gasket I used a lil black sealant every 5 inches to hold the gasket in place, I then installed it and left everything hand tight in place for about 1-2hrs while I searched for a torque wrench. When I finally did get around to torquing it the sealant probably hardened a bit.

    The helms states that you shouldnt leave sealant for more then 30mins without mating, so I'm sure it never seated rite and thats what causing the leaks. DOH!


  13. #13
    White90
    maybe, maybe not. I like to goop the fuck out of my gaskets with hondabond. This next one will get the royal treatment. Don't leak on me

  14. #14

    Join Date
    02 Sep 2003
    Location
    bay area, CA, USA
    when you took off the old gasket did you notice little metal rings on the studs that stick down? OEM gaskets sometimes have metal rings in the gasket so you can only tighten them down to a certian point. When removing the old gasket the get stuck on the studs sometimes and if you install a new gasket without removing these rings, your oil pan will still leak cause the gasket isnt sealing all the way.

    Also you dont need to use that much honda bond or any other gasket sealer. let the gasket do its job. Just put a few dabs on the corners aand you should be set.

    over tightening the gasket will cause it to still leak,

    Just letting you know from my personal experiences at work.

  15. #15
    White90
    I agree with you on the over torq and how most people just honda bond the corners (like how I do valve covers).

    The current dealership gasket for the b18a1 does not have the metal rings in it. Maybe the b18b1 does.. but I crossed my acura part number and picked up the gasket from a 97 crv at my favorite honda dealer.

  16. #16

    Join Date
    02 Sep 2003
    Location
    bay area, CA, USA
    oh thats cool. I couldnt remeber if the integras had the ring or not.

  17. #17

    Join Date
    13 Nov 2006
    Location
    Virginia, East Coast
    I used the blue rubber gasket with no rings and i coated the whole thing in a real thin layer of the black RTV then torqued it to what my hand said was good. no leaks at all. On vlave covers i do the same and Iv'e never had a problem. Iv'e done tons of them that way.

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