Results 1 to 3 of 3

Thread: Rustoleum Vinyl paint

  1. #1
    vtec-typer

    Rustoleum Vinyl paint

    Okay, someone suggested to use Rustoleum paint for their vinyl interior. Well, Rustoleum now has a Vinyl paint, so I guess this would be the best thing to use. I know Rustoleum sticks very well to plastic because I painted my wipers years ago, and now there are just a few chips on the front probably from flying debris. Now, some of you suggest to use sandable primer. Others say use the adhesive promoter. The only problem is that Rustoleum only makes a sandable primer (general automotive, not designed for vinyl). The adhesive promoter that I found is a different brand paint, and I am not comfortable mixing different brands, so any suggestions? The adhesive primer that I got is Plasti Kote Flexible Adhesive Promoter. Also, which clear coat should I use with the Vinyl paint? I also have a can of Plasti Kote Vinyl paint, so I am a little torn here. Any suggestions and recommendations?

  2. #2

    Join Date
    29 Oct 2001
    Location
    Baltimore, Maryland
    Good questions. I'd like to hear some thoughts on this too.
    Blacksquad Member #005
    218,000 miles and, um, well...
    I finally signed up! AIM: Exit20Sedan

  3. #3
    vtec-typer

    re: Vinyl paint

    Here is an article that I discoverd on the net. It is from an expert on Vinyl Painting. What do you guys think. Here is the URL:
    vinyl painting


    Working with vinyl

    Our Tip of the Month originated from questions that popped up on an Internet chat group, the Modelcarlist (www.modelcarlist.com). One of the list members was curious as to what type of paint could be used on vinyl. If you've ever played with this material, you know it's slippery stuff, and ordinary paint simply won't stick to it. Knowing very little about painting vinyl myself, I turned to my scale-modeling friend and International Plastic Modelers Society (IPMS) President Chuck Davenport. Chuck does an extraordinary job modeling and painting vinyl figures (as well as just about any other subject). We are lucky enough to have Chuck share the following vinyl painting techniques with us, to help master this often perplexing modeling medium.

    Sanding


    Vinyl can be sanded just like any other material. Prepare the vinyl parts for painting as you would any part by removing molding seams and such. However, stay clear of very abrasive grits as they can rough up the surface too much.

    Washing


    Wash the vinyl using Methyl Ethyl Ketone (MEK). This solvent, which is similar to fingernail polish remover, can be purchased at hardware and paint stores. Allow the fluid to flow over the model. Do this outdoors or in a well-ventilated area, wearing both rubber gloves and a respirator. Lacquer thinner can also be used to clean vinyl, but I prefer MEK because it etches the surface, giving it a "tooth" to which the primer can better adhere.

    Priming


    Immediately after washing the vinyl parts with MEK, apply an even coat of SEM-brand gray primer. This is a specially formulated prep coating used by automotive repair technicians for restoring color to the vinyl used on car bumpers. This primer adheres quite well to vinyl, whereas a conventional primer will eventually peel off under normal handling. You can purchase SEM-brand primers at automotive paint supply stores.

    Painting


    The following is true for all paints: Paint doesn't care what material is under the primer, it only needs to be compatible with the primer. As long as the stress loading on the part doesn't exceed the paint's ability to flex and maintain a bond, it's happy. Therefore, you can use any paint you wish over the primer. I've used oils, enamels, acrylics, acrylic enamels, lacquers, and base/clear epoxy paints with SEM primers, and had good results will all of them.

    Chuck's techniques will work on all types of vinyl applications, from hand painting a figure for your next diorama project to airbrushing that special color on vinyl film for upholstering an interior. Next time you see a vinyl part or accessory you'd like to use, give Chuck's techniques a try. Thanks, Chuck, for sharing your vinyl painting methods with us!

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •